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Satellite view of a compact Hurricane Hilary

Satellite view of a compact Hurricane Hilary

It's not often that tropical cyclone names coincide perfectly with political ongoings, but Hurricane Hilary is seemingly one such occasion.

By the time Hilary speeds up to it, Irwin will be a weaker storm - far too weak to take on its younger sister.

Ahead of the rain, the SMN warned that winds and waves will pose a risk along the coast of four states and asked the residents to pay attention to safety recommendations by civil protection authorities.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 15 miles from the storm's center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles. Hilary was moving toward the west near 13 miles per hour (20 km/h), and NHC noted that this general motion with some decrease in forward speed is expected over the next couple of days. Gradual weakening is forecast during the next few days as the storm moves over cooler waters and encounters wind shear. Tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles from the center.




Little change in strength is forecast during the next 48 hours. Moving west-northwest at 12 mph, Hilary is 515 miles south of the southern tip of Baja California.

There's something eerily familiar about a storm named "Hilary" that - after seemingly moving successfully and confidently in one direction - gets disrupted by the spin from another whirling system, eventually losing out to it. This general motion is expected over the next couple of days.

Tropical Storm Irwin is expected to reach at least Category 1 status by Tuesday morning, and retain hurricane strength until late in the week.