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Supreme Court dismisses 1 of 2 travel ban cases

Supreme Court dismisses 1 of 2 travel ban cases

The Supreme Court announced Tuesday it had dismissed as moot a case from Maryland involving the fight over President Trump's travel ban.

Both of the challenges were filed after the president's March 6 order imposed a 90-day freeze on the entry into the United States by travelers from six Muslim-majority countries: Somalia, Sudan, Libya, Yemen, Syria and Iran.

If the justices are indeed waiting for the 120-day suspension of the refugee program to expire on October 24, there may not be any action on the Hawaii case in the Supreme Court until then.

Though many lower federal courts in liberal circuits ruled against the executive order, the Trump administration was set for victory in June, when the Supreme Court lifted an injunction against the enforcement of the so-called "travel ban", leaving the case to be argued in the fall.




That case could yet be dismissed once the refugee ban expires on October 24, meaning the court remains unlikely to issue a final ruling on whether the ban was lawful.

One judge has already scheduled a hearing for Monday on a request to block Trump's new order before it kicks in next week.

The reason: the president issued a new version of the order last month that replaces the older version that had been the subject of litigation in the Fourth Circuit, rendering the case moot. The justices will most likely only turn to that case after October 24, when the refugee provision of the March executive order also expires.

Among the issues raised is whether the travel ban discriminated against Muslims in violation of the U.S. Constitution's prohibition on the government favoring or disfavoring a particular religion. The American Civil Liberties Union, the state of Hawaii and other immigrants' rights groups have filed new suits to challenge Trump's latest travel ban, which has no time limit. The lawyer dismissed the case in a way which preserved the appeals court ruling against the ban rather than vacating it.