Medical

Eating cheese every day may be good for you

Eating cheese every day may be good for you

The publication reported on 15 studies with more than 200,000 participants and showed that the risk of someone suffering from heart disease or a stroke was significantly less than someone who rarely, or never ate cheese.

Overall, people who consumed high levels of cheese were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke and 14 percent less likely to develop coronary heart disease than participants who consumed no cheese. 40 grams of cheese is a roughly the size of a matchbox and slightly more than an ounce serving. Importantly, they are observational, so they do not prove a causal association between cheese intake and better cardiovascular health.

For the uninitiated, cheese has high levels of saturated fat, which has been linked to high cholesterol, atherosclerosis, and increased chances of developing a heart disease.

Cheese is typically considered more of an indulgence than a health food, but a new review of research suggests that it may not be as bad for you as once thought.




While cheese is a source of saturated fat, the researchers state that it "also has potentially beneficial nutrients", such as calcium, which helps limit how much saturated fat the body absorbs.

"There is some evidence that cheese-as a substitute for milk, for example-may actually have a protective effect on the heart", says Stewart. With the average American consuming 42.5 grams of food each day, you may find yourself eating less cheese if you want the maximum benefits. It may very well be that the people who ate cheese and had lower risks of heart disease may have been doing something else to make sure they were healthy, such as exercising. "But on the upside, a bit of cheese on a cracker doesn't sound unreasonable".

The study also failed to look at various kinds of cheeses, which might have yielded different results as there are certain kinds that include more benefits or risks than the typical cheese.

New findings may enhance your enjoyment of après-ski raclettes or holiday cheese boards.