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Myanmar army's admission of killings a positive step, says Suu Kyi

Myanmar army's admission of killings a positive step, says Suu Kyi

Japan's Foreign Minister Taro Kono visited Myanmar's Rakhine state on Saturday after meeting with the country's de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, in the capital of Naypyitaw a day earlier.

The request comes after Myanmar military admitted that some of its soldiers were involved in the murder of 10 captured Rohingya men in western Rakhine state in September previous year and buried them in a mass grave near Inn Din village in Maungdaw township.

"It is a positive indication that we are taking the steps to be responsible", Suu Kyi said according to the report in the Global New Light of Myanmar newspaper. "But I believe that our investigation will prevent such things from happening again".

Aung San Suu Kyi thanked Japan for its support after the country announced on Friday it would give a total of 23 million dollars, subject to parliamentary approval, for rehabilitation of refugees and improving humanitarian conditions in Rakhine State.




The military launched "clearance operations" against ethnic Rohingya in August, prompting more than 650,000 to flee into neighboring Bangladesh in what the United Nations has called "ethnic cleansing". But the military has insisted that there has been no wrongdoing by any security forces.

As of December 2017, an estimated 6,55,000 Rohingya people fled to Bangladesh to avoid the persecution from the security forces that started in Myanmar's Rakhine state in August previous year.

The Rakhine state is home to a majority of Muslims in Myanmar, who have been denied citizenship and long faced persecution in the Buddhist-majority country, especially from the extremists.

Rights groups have accused Nobel Laureate Suu Kyi of failing to condemn the widespread abuses during the army crackdown, which followed raids by militants from the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA).