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$560m US Powerball victor allowed to remain anonymous

$560m US Powerball victor allowed to remain anonymous

The woman won the Powerball drawing January 6 after buying the ticket at Reeds Ferry Market, a convenience store in Merrimack.

The victor of a US$560 million Powerball jackpot - one of the largest prizes in United States history - can remain anonymous, a New Hampshire judge ruled on Monday.

Lottery victor in New Hampshire fights for her right to remain anonymous; Molly Line reports from New Hampshire.

Doe, Temple noted, had "met her burden of showing that her privacy interest in the nondisclosure of her name outweighs the public interest in the disclosure of her name".

The woman's lawyer William Shaheen said his client "was jumping up and down", following the ruling.

"The Court has no doubts whatsoever that should Ms. Doe's identity be revealed, she will be subject to an alarming amount of harassment, solicitation and unwanted communications", the judge's resolution states.

He decided that she could keep her identity private but her home town could be revealed - Merrimack, about 25 miles south of Concord.

She was upset after learning she was giving up her anonymity by signing the ticket - something the lottery commission acknowledged isn't spelled out on the ticket, but is detailed on its website.




However, Temple added that nothing in his order could be interpreted to prevent the lottery commission or its employees from "processing, maintaining, or accessing Ms. Doe's ticket in the normal course of business".

The victor will collect a lump sum of about $358 million, before subtracting for taxes, according to the New Hampshire Lottery.

Doe put her name and address on the winning ticket for the Jan 6. draw, but before she sent it to the New Hampshire Lottery Commission, she turned to attorneys to see if she could remain anonymous.

Temple, who already agreed to let Doe collect her winnings through the Good Karma Family Trust of 2018 several weeks earlier, refused meanwhile to let Doe keep her hometown a secret.

In the resolution, Temple called that argument "weak" because a trustee claiming a prize on behalf of an anonymous individual is certainly not a "bona fide" participant and is not the "real" victor of the prize.

The commission says it will consult with the attorney general's office to determine what to do next regarding the case. The commission hasn't responded to a request for comment on the judge's decision.

Last week she received just over $264m - her winnings minus taxes and bearing in mind winners get a smaller amount if they opt for a lump sum payment.

Doe has pledged to donate around $25 million to $50 million of the largess to charity over time.