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Alabama, Mississippi activate National Guard ahead of Subtropical Storm Alberto

Alabama, Mississippi activate National Guard ahead of Subtropical Storm Alberto

At 8 a.m. Monday, the National Hurricane Center updated its forecast to say Alberto, positioned about 100 miles south-southeast of Destin, had winds of up to 65 mph and was expected to cross the northern Gulf Coast in the warning area Monday afternoon or evening.

Forecasters anxious that as Subtropical Storm Alberto spun north through the Gulf of Mexico this weekend, it would fling moisture from the south toward Tampa Bay, assaulting the area with an endless barrage of rain that could lead to risky river flooding.

Alabama, Florida and MS are preparing for states of emergency as Subtropical Storm Alberto heads toward the Gulf of Mexico.

The Florida Division of Emergency Management said in a statement Sunday that a mandatory evacuation has been issued in Franklin County for all barrier islands there and those in the county living directly on the coast in mobile homes or in recreation vehicle parks.

Temperatures then will sink from the mid-80s on Tuesday to the low-70s, with possible rain showers near the end of Wednesday. According to the National Weather Service, almost half of all flash flood fatalities are vehicle-related.

That's why forecasters rapidly upped the storm's chance for development last week and concern grew for a totally washed out holiday weekend.

A satellite image shows Alberto as it nears landfall on the Florida Panhandle and the Gulf Coast on Monday
View Slideshow A satellite image shows Alberto as it nears landfall on the Florida Panhandle and the Gulf Coast on Monday. NOAA STAR

The US-based National Hurricane Centre is warning that Alberto could produce up to 600 millimetres of rain in western Cuba.

Florida, Alabama and MS declare states of emergency; Jonathan Serrie reports from Florida.

If you're traveling on Sunday or Memorial Day, the worst weather will be in areas west and northwest of Central Florida, including much of the Panhandle and the west coast of the state. About 400 customers along Florida's Tampa Bay and in the Panhandle were without power Monday morning, according to Florida's Division of Emergency Management.

The 2018 hurricane officially season begins Friday.

A tropical storm warning remained in effect for an area stretching from the Suwannee River to the border of Alabama and Mississippi. For a depiction of areas at risk, please see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic, available at hurricanes.gov. With the leftover tropical moisture from Alberto, the atmosphere becomes unstable after the sun rises, and warms the area, causing some showers. The storm has maximum sustained winds of 50 miles per hour and the NHC says it is moving north-northwest at 12 miles per hour. The main threat is from heavy rain that could lead to flooding, the city said, but also high winds and storm surge could cause problems.