Medical

Sleeping in on weekends could save your life

Sleeping in on weekends could save your life

"The duration of sleep is important for longevity", said Thorbjorn Akersted of the Stress Research Institute in Sweden, quoted by The Guardian.

"The mortality rate among participants with short sleep during weekdays, but long sleep during weekends, did not differ from the rate of the reference group", a section of the research read.

Swedish and United States researchers claim that sleeping in on weekends might not be such a bad thing, adding a couple of could of years to our lifespans especially if you don't get enough rest during the other days of the week.

Their findings stated that those under the age of 65 who had five hours sleep or less at the weekends had a 52 per cent higher mortality rate than those who had six or seven hours sleep.

Not having a sufficient amount of sleep obviously isn't ideal, as it's been linked to having a higher risk of developing conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease.




Interestingly, people who slept too much, regularly hitting the hay for eight hours or longer a night, also had a worse mortality rate. "It's a requirement", said Grandner, director of the Sleep and Health Research Program and an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry in the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson.

"What happens is, if you are well-rested, your sleep drive will be low in the morning, and it builds and builds over the day, when at night you need to go to bed to relieve that pressure for sleep".

We often hear about how the most successful people wake up early and get a jump start on their day before the sun is up.

However, the effect of not sleeping enough during the working days may be at least partially offset during the weekend.