World

Compensation sought for Australians caught up in Facebook privacy breach

Compensation sought for Australians caught up in Facebook privacy breach

"We are fully cooperating with the investigation now under way by the Australian Privacy Commissioner and will review any additional evidence that is made available when the UK Office of the Information Commissioner releases their report", the spokeswoman said.

The UK's ICO - aka the Information Commissioner's Office - on Wednesday ruled Facebook had twice broken British data protection laws - by failing to safeguard people's information, and by failing to be properly transparent about how that info can be used.

The revelations that data belonging to as many as 87 million Facebook users and their friends may have been misused is a "game changer" in the world of data protection, Denham said.

Facebook is facing a record £500,000 fine for twice breaching the Data Protection Act.

In a statement issued in advance, information commissioner Elizabeth Denham warned that voters' faith in the political system was being eroded.

The Facebook probe is part of a wider investigation into the use of data in political campaigns, which the ICO launched past year, the interim results of which are out today. The ICO said it was providing the interim report to help that inquiry.

However, the Information Commissioner's report said other regulatory action would include a criminal prosecution against Cambridge Analytica's parent firm, SCL Elections, for failing to deal with the regulator's enforcement notice.

Cambridge Analytica, a London firm financed by wealthy US Republican donors, worked for the 2016 Trump campaign and for a while employed Steve Bannon, the CEO of US President Donald Trump's campaign and later a White House adviser.




"The complaint seeks financial recompense for the unauthorised access to, and use of, their personal data".

Apart from Facebook, the probe is also covering more companies and there are plans to send warning letters to 11 political parties.

Denham also called for the government to introduce a statutory code of practice for the use of personal data in political campaigns, adding that "this can not be at the expense of transparency, fairness and compliance with the law".

"This can not by left to a secret internal investigation at Facebook". "People can not have control over their own data if they don't know or understand how it is being used".

David Carroll, an academic who is attempting to recover his data from Cambridge Analytica, said the report strengthened his legal challenge.

ICO, which does not normally publish its findings, said it would give the public another update on its investigation in October.

The social giant permitted apps to collect this information until 2015, but the United Kingdom watchdog said Tuesday it was concerned that many people on the site "may not have been sufficiently informed that their data was accessible in this way".

"If other developers broke the law we have a right to know, and the users whose data may have been compromised in this way should be informed".