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USA fighters intercept Russian bomber near Alaska

USA fighters intercept Russian bomber near Alaska

Air Force F-22 Raptors intercepted a pair of Russian bombers and their fighter escorts this week near Alaska, according to North American Aerospace Defense Command.

Such intercepts have happened about 60 times between 2007 and 2017, The New York Times reported past year.

In May, the Russian Defense Ministry said that Russia's Tu-95 strategic bombers and Tu-142 anti-submarine aircraft jets were escorted by two U.S. F-22 fighters when they flew over the neutral waters of the Arctic Ocean, the Bering Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk on a routine flight. "The identification and monitoring of aircraft entering a US or Canadian Air Defense identification Zone demonstrates how NORAD executes its aerospace warning and aerospace control missions for the United States and Canada".

During the September 1 bomber incursion, the Tu-95s were not shadowed by Russian jets. It added that the intercept took place while the Russian bombers were in the US Air Defense Identification Zone, which extends about 200 miles off Alaska's western coast.

The Navy's major ballistic missile submarine base is located at Bangor, Washington.




For the second time in less than two weeks, Russian aircraft have flirted with United States airspace near Alaska.

"The homeland is no longer a sanctuary and the ability to deter and defeat threats to our citizens, vital infrastructure, and national institutions starts with successfully detecting, tracking, and positively identifying aircraft of interest approaching US and Canadian airspace", said General Terrence J.

Gen. Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy, the NORAD commander, added, "The homeland is no longer a sanctuary, and the ability to deter and defeat threats to our citizens, vital infrastructure, and national institutions starts with successfully detecting, tracking, and positively identifying aircraft of interest approaching USA. and Canadian airspace".

No other details of the intercept were disclosed.

"The homeland is no longer a sanctuary and the ability to deter and defeat threats to our citizens, vital infrastructure, and national institutions starts with successfully detecting, tracking, and positively identifying aircraft of interest approaching US and Canadian airspace", said NORAD Commander General Terrence J.