Science

MI man's doorstop rock turns out to be a $100000 meteorite

MI man's doorstop rock turns out to be a $100000 meteorite

This year, the man was inspired by stories of MI residents finding and selling pieces of meteorites.

The man said that he was able to discover the meteorite's origins, noting that he'd spoken with the farmer who'd originally discovered the space rock in the 1930s.

"Within seconds, I knew it was a real one", Sirbescu said when she saw the meteorite.

According to Central Michigan University, the 22-pound meteorite rock was brought in to be examined by an unnamed man who said he had been using it as a doorstop for several decades.

The man reportedly hasn't figured out exactly where the meteorite will end up, but a number of institutions are apparently considering purchasing it from him for display.

The man then made a decision to take his rock to Mona Sirbescu, a geology faculty member in earth and atmospheric sciences at Central Michigan University.

"For 18 years, the answer has been categorically "no" - meteor wrongs, not meteorites", she said with a smile.

David Mazurek says he took his doorstop to the university for examination after seeing reports in January of meteorite pieces selling for thousands of dollars.

A man has discovered a rock he's been using as a doorstop for 30 years is actually worth more than A$140,000.




The unidentified man told the professor the meteorite was passed on to him in 1988, when he bought a farm in Edmore, Michigan.

He was content to use it for propping the barn door open the last 30 years, until MI residents began selling much smaller meteorite bits that were sprinkled across the state when a meteor blazed through the sky in January, he told the university.

What's 88.5 percent iron, 11.5 percent nickel and worth $100,000?

The Smithsonian museum has valued the meteorite, which they named the Edford, at $100,000.

Now the Smithsonian museum is considering buying the space rock, and it could fetch as much as $100,000, the release says.

Throughout her tenure, Sirbescu has frequently been asked to examine specimens of alleged space rocks, to see if they were worth any money.

He also told the station that he plans to donate 10 percent of the sale price to Central Michigan University.

"Just think, what I was holding is a piece of the early solar system that literally fell into our hands", Sirbescu said of the meteorite.