Science

IPCC's Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C

IPCC's Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C

Based on more than 6,000 scientific references across 40 countries, the report outlines the impacts of global warming.

The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report concludes human-caused greenhouse gas emissions have already pushed global average temperatures up by 1°C since the second half of the 19 century.

It also highlighted the environment has already seent he consequences of 1ºC of global warming in the form of more extreme weather, rising sea levels and diminishing Arctic Sea ice, among other changes.

Dramatically reducing the use of coal, planting huge swathes of land with carbon-absorbing forest or powering most transport with electricity are no longer sufficient to bring about the swift transition needed, they said, with warming expected to pass the 1.5 degree Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) mark in as little as 12 years.

Coral reefs would decline by 70 per cent to 90 per cent at 1.5 deg C, whereas virtually all would be lost at 2 deg C. Trillions of dollars will soon be invested in new infrastructure; if we make the wrong choices, they'll be locked in, according to the same recent report.

If 1.5 degrees of warming does occur, Southeast Asian countries like Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam, including countries like Japan, China, Egypt, and the US will experience increased flooding by 2040.

The dramatic report warned that the planet is now heading to warm by 3C. Morrison says, 'Let's not forget Australia accounts for just over 1% of global emissions.

This means no more Carbon dioxide should be put out than is being removed by current measures, such as planting trees.

"Scientists are increasingly aware that every half degree of warming matters", Chris Weber, WWF's global climate and energy lead scientist, said in a statement. Problematically, the effectiveness of the negative emissions techniques that would be relied upon in such a scenario is unproven on a large scale.




Limiting the increase to 1.5 degrees would also have a dramatic impact on economic growth and development in poorer countries, which could reduce the number of people both exposed to climate-related risks and susceptible to poverty by several hundred million by 2050, it said.

"We welcome the conclusions of this historic report, one that should give the worldwide community not just a wake-up call, but also hope that we can avoid the most devastating impacts of climate change", said Bill Hare, Climate Analytics CEO.

"Limiting warming to 1.5ºC is possible within the laws of chemistry and physics but doing so would require unprecedented changes", said Jim Skea, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group III.

Henn was actually responding to Penn State University climate scientist Michael Mann who was pushing back against those criticizing the IPCC report as too "alarmist" in its declarations and warnings.

Delaying action on climate change "is something that is explicitly contradicted in the report", he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Scientists consider that temperature to be a tipping point at which many severe effects of global warming will be realized.

At the current rate of global warming, the world's temperatures are set to increase by another 1.5C between 2030 and 2052.

Global Warming of 1.5 °C is the first in a series of Special Reports to be produced in the IPCC's Sixth Assessment Cycle.

Dale Marshall, national program manager at Environmental Defence, said the ongoing political fight over carbon pricing and criticism of Liberal energy policies is scaring the government into being more timid about its climate plan, while the report shows being timid is not going to cut it.

The likelihood that we will reach the 1.5 °C warming threshold is highly dependent upon the emission pathways of non-CO2 climate pollutants, such as methane and black carbon.