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Mueller team begins writing final report

Mueller team begins writing final report

Democrats have slammed Whitaker's appointment to replace Sessions, arguing that Trump is trying to undermine Mueller and demanding that Whitaker recuse himself from supervising the Mueller investigation due to his writings and public comments attacking the investigation.

Several Republican senators, including the newly elected Mitt Romney, a former presidential candidate, said that the investigation led by Robert Mueller must be allowed to reach its conclusion.

Democrats, who won the lower house of Congress in Tuesday's midterm elections, now see Trump as close to crossing that line with the ultimate goal of covering up alleged crimes.

Russian Federation denies meddling in the election, and Trump denies any "collusion" with Russian Federation.

MoveOn is also heading a petition asking legislatures to protect the investigation, which had reached more than 475,000 signatures as of Thursday evening.

Matt Whitaker has taken over as acting-attorney general.

Mr Whitaker can now assume control of the Mueller inquiry, which has been overseen by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein until now.

Last November, Whitaker penned a CNN op-ed claiming that the Robert Mueller investigation was going too far by digging into the president's financial records.




If Whitaker made a decision to fire Mueller, he would need to inform the special counsel in writing of the specific reason for his termination.

Here is a look at how Whitaker might stop or slow the Mueller investigation and the risks he might run in doing so.

Earlier on Wednesday, Mr Trump denied he would shut down Mr Mueller's team, but still labelled the investigation an illegal "witch hunt" that had spent "millions" of dollars.

The former FBI director has been working with a team of prosecutors and agents for the previous year and a half to investigate whether the Trump campaign illegally coordinated with Russian Federation to tip the 2016 election, and whether Trump tried to obstruct that investigation. The move has sparked concern that Whitaker would end or hamper the investigation. Sessions recused himself in March 2017 because of his work on Trump's campaign and following the revelation that he had met during the 2016 campaign with the Russian ambassador to the U.S.

Answering allegations that the White House had used a clip edited by a notorious right-wing conspiracy theorist, Trump spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said: "We stand by our statement".

One reason Sessions endured months of taunting from Trump is that he believed he was protecting the integrity of the Justice Department and was trying to prevent the president from bringing in someone who would politicize it, according to a USA official who has worked with Sessions and frequently talked with him. Jerry Nadler, the top Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee, said he wants "answers immediately" and "we will hold people accountable".

Sessions endured the name-calling in silence, even as he aggressively carried out the administration's conservative policies, such as stripping federal funding from so-called sanctuary cities and states and rescinding protection for young adults brought into the country illegally as children.

The special counsel's office upheld a long-standing Justice Department guideline that calls for discretion in taking legal or law enforcement measures within 60 days of an election in an effort to avoid the impression of attempting to sway voters.