Medical

20% Rise in Insulin Use by 2030, Study Says

20% Rise in Insulin Use by 2030, Study Says

In the next 12 years, half of those with type 2 diabetes won't be able to receive potentially life-saving insulin unless access to the drug improves, new research shows.

The study aimed at comparing alternative projections for and consequences of insulin use worldwide under varying treatment algorithms and degrees of insulin access revealed that access to insulin in many areas is low. Insulin treatment is expensive and the market is now dominated by three manufacturers, according to the study. Based on that data, the researchers estimate that the number of adult type 2 diabetics will increase from 406 million to 511 million, with more than half of them being located in the US, India, and China.

For the study, the team used data from the International Diabetes Federation and 14 cohort studies and estimated the burden of Type-2 diabetes in 221 countries and territories between 2018 and 2030.

"Despite the UN's commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access", said lead author Sanjay Basu from Stanford University, US.

The researchers conclude in the journal The Lancet that of all these diabetes patients, 79 million would actually be in need of insulin to manage their diabetes.

98 million Indians will suffer from diabetes by 2030 says Study
India had 69.2 million people living with diabetes in 2015 says a report of the World Health Organization

Diabetes affects more than 382 million people worldwide. Study Says The Ketogenic Diet Could Increase The Risk For Type 2 Diabetes.

The researchers have warned that new strategies must be adopted to make insulin more widely available and affordable.

It should be also noted that about 33 million people now do not have access to insulin.

"Despite the UN's commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access", said Basu. There will be an increase in the number of adults with Type 2 diabetes in the coming 12 years due to ageing, urbanization, and related substitutes in diet and physical activity.

At the same time, global insulin use is projected to rise from 526 million 1000-unit vials in 2018 to 634 million in 2030. Unless governments commence inventiveness to make insulin accessible and economical, then its application is going to be far from appropriate.