Medical

What's the Best Diet for 2019? Experts Weigh In

What's the Best Diet for 2019? Experts Weigh In

For the second year in a row, the Mediterranean diet was named the best diet in America by U.S. News & World Report.

Since the Best Diets rankings were introduced in 2010, WW has continued to evolve the program, incorporating the latest nutritional and behavioral science while reflecting how people want to live their lives to help members integrate positive, sustainable lifestyle changes into their everyday lives, no matter where they are on their journey. It's hard to know for sure, but recently, a panel of health experts debated the topic for U.S. News and ranked 41 different diets.

Although the popular Keto diet ranked high for fast weight loss, it landed way down on the Best Diets list - tying for number 38.

The Mediterranean diet came out on top.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating pattern that emulates how people in the Mediterranean region have traditionally eaten, with a focus on foods like olive oil, fish and vegetables.

The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet was created to help manage blood pressure, but experts say it has many overall health benefits, helping it nab the number 2 spot on the best overall diets list.

In addition to lowering blood pressure, research suggests the DASH diet may help reduce the risk of diabetes and may also help fight depression.




Doctors say healthy weight loss is just one to two pounds per week.

And no, unfortunately, there is still no magic fix for losing weight, but there are certain diets that have been shown to be more successful. You can have red wine in moderation if you'd like, but you must get plenty of exercise and enjoy meals with family and friends.

The "new meat" food group includes tofu, beans, lentils, peas, nuts, seeds and eggs, according to U.S. News and World Report.

If you're gearing up to eat healthier this year, consider including whole grains, seafood, and healthy fats in your diet.

The eating plan features a wide variety of options, including fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, poultry, and fish.

WW's Freestyle program applies points values to foods, with higher points for foods high in saturated fats and sugars, and lower points for foods with high levels of protein.