World

Poland detains Huawei employee, accuses him of spying for China

Poland detains Huawei employee, accuses him of spying for China

Wasik said that the Chinese suspect was a businessman working for a major electronics corporation and that the Pole was "known in circles associated with cyber-business affairs". Huawei and Orange could not immediately be reached for comment.

Ties between the United States and China have become increasingly strained since Canadian authorities arrested a Huawei executive, Meng Wanzhou, in December at the request of USA authorities.

In a coordinated arrest, police also detained a Polish citizen named Piotr D. - a former Internal Security Agency official who now works for the telecom Orange Polska, according to Poland's TVP Info, which first reported the story.

A Chinese Huawei "director" and a Polish cyber business specialist have been arrested in Poland on suspicion of spying for China, it has emerged. If convicted, the pair could face up to 10 years imprisonment.

TVP said the Polish national was a former agent of the internal security agency. "Huawei complies with all applicable laws and regulations in the countries where it operates, and we require every employee to abide by the laws and regulations in the countries where they are based". She was granted bail but remains in Vancouver under 24-hour surveillance.




Spying, and working in concert with the Chinese government, are the two chief allegations several Western nations are leveling against Huawei, which recently overtook Apple as the world's second-largest smartphone manufacturer. He remains in China's custody. The U.S. must submit an extradition hearing by the end of January.

The U.S. also pressured European countries to cut ties with the Chinese telecom company amid links to the Chinese government and data security concerns.

While the MateBook 13 was certainly Huawei's biggest focus at CES 2019, it wasn't the only announcement from the company.

Some European governments and telecom companies are following the US lead in questioning whether using Huawei for vital infrastructure for mobile networks could leave them exposed to snooping by the Chinese government.