Science

2018 the fourth-hottest year in history

2018 the fourth-hottest year in history

CNN reported that Nasa and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration collected independent data that dates back to 1884 and 1880 respectively to monitor global temperature.

Two US agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the WMO have analysed global temperatures in slightly different ways, but each came to the same conclusion on Wednesday: 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record behind 2016, 2015 and 2017.

The new report said the world was on track to have average global temperatures rise to 3 degrees Celsius by 2100, as record levels of man-made greenhouse gas emissions, mainly from burning fossil fuels, is trapping more heat in the Earth's atmosphere.

An iceberg melts in the waters off Antarctica. "Many of the extreme weather events are consistent with what we expect from a changing climate". But if you look at two, three, four, now five very warm years, then it is much harder to dismiss that.

"2018 is yet again an extremely warm year on top of a long-term global warming trend", Gavin Schmidt, director of GISS, said in a statement. Higher than normal temperatures are shown in red.

NASA's temperature analyses incorporate surface temperature measurements from 6,300 weather stations, ship- and buoy-based observations of sea surface temperatures, and temperature measurements from Antarctic research stations.




US President Donald Trump, who has cast doubt on mainstream climate science and promotes the coal industry, plans to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement.

The World Meteorological Organization announced similar findings Wednesday.

Trump has vowed to pull out of the 2015 Paris agreement forged by almost 200 countries, including the U.S. The pact sets a goal of keeping global warming "well below" 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit over pre-industrial levels, a threshold meant to avert the most devastating and irreversible effects of climate change.

The 2018 global temperature reports were originally scheduled for release in mid-January, but they were delayed because the 35-day partial government shutdown prevented government scientists from finalizing their calculations.

Dr. Schmidt spoke of these markers not as cliffs that the world would plunge over, however, but part of a continuing slide toward increasing levels of harm.