World

Jury Reaches Verdict in El Chapo Trial

Jury Reaches Verdict in El Chapo Trial

World's most infamous cartel boss Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman found guilty.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, once the most powerful drug lord in the world, was convicted in New York City on all counts on February 11.

Guzman's wife, Emma Coronel Aispuro, leaves Brooklyn federal court on January 17 after attending the trial.

One of the major figures in Mexican drug wars that have roiled the country since 2006, Guzman was extradited to the United States for trial in 2017 after he was arrested in Mexico the year before.

The government, meanwhile, appealed to the jury not to let Guzman escape - an allusion to his two spectacular jail breaks in Mexico, the last one in 2015 through a tunnel from a shower area in his cell. When the jury was discharged, he leaned back in his chair to catch the eye of his wife, Emma Coronel Aispuro, who gave him a subtle thumbs-up.

NY jurors - seven women and five men - whose identities were kept secret reached a verdict after deliberating six days, sorting through what authorities called an "avalanche" of evidence gathered since the late 1980s that Guzman and his murderous Sinaloa drug cartel made billions of dollars by smuggling tons of cocaine, heroin, meth and marijuana into the U.S.

On Tuesday, Lichtman called the conviction "devastating", but he said he was proud that the defence "left it all on the battlefield".




Witnesses detailed assassinations and political payoffs, and how drugs were smuggled using tanker trucks, railway carriages and even shipments of canned peppers.

Federal prosecutors say Guzman's Sinaloa cartel amassed billions of dollars importing tons of cocaine, heroin and marijuana into the U.S.

Jurors at the USA trial of Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman are in their sixth day of deliberations.

In a statement after the verdict, lawyers for El Chapo said they were "obviously disappointed" but respectful of the jury's decision.

The defense has accused prosecution cooperators of making him a scapegoat for their own crimes.

Likewise, the trial involved the twice-daily closing of the Brooklyn Bridge to ensure safe passage for the for the parade of government vehicles transporting El Chapo from the prison to the courthouse.

The most detailed evidence against Guzman came from more than a dozen former associates who struck deals to cooperate with US prosecutors.